Top 3 Wire Jewellery Tutorials for those who like to play on Master Difficulty

So far I’ve made two lists of my top 5 jewellery tutorials, one for beginner artists, and one for more experienced designers. Whilst going through my personal bookmark collection however, I came across a couple of tutorials that I saved, hoping that one day I’d be able to come back and create the wonderful jewellery they teach. Well, looking at them again now, I still like to think I’ll be able to make them one day… unfortunately, that day is a very, very long way off!

If you yourself are the kind of daring soul that loves a challenge, or likes to play through life on Master Difficulty, you’re more than welcome to try your hand at them. Do make sure you post your results in the comments though; I’d love to see if anyone can actually make these designs!

And so I present to you my –

Top 3 Jewellery Tutorials for those of you who like to play on Master!

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Top 5 Intermediate to Advanced Wire Jewellery Tutorials

In my last post we took a look at some of the wonderful jewellery tutorials available for free around the web, teaching everything from basic ring-making to slightly more advanced wire sculpture. Seeing as the tutorials featured in that post were aimed almost solely at the beginner artist however, I decided to make a second post with tutorials for an artist who already has a more advanced skill set. So, here are my…

Top 5 Intermediate to Advanced Wire Jewellery Tutorials

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Photoshop for Beginners; Destructive Tendencies

Okay, so I realised when I was writing this tutorial about levels and curves that I really needed to write a bit about destructive and non-destructive editing and file formats, but unfortunately there’s a lot to be written about it, so I decided to put it into a separate mini-tutorial 🙂

And so, I present to you Photoshop for Beginners Part 4; Destructive Tendencies

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Photoshop for Beginners; Levelling that Curve

For the next part of my ‘Photoshop for beginners’ series, I thought I’d take a look at the two most basic (and most used) PS adjustments; levels and curves. Most photo-editing software has these two adjustment tabs somewhere within their interface, so you can follow along with this tutorial even if you don’t have photoshop itself 🙂

Also, this isn’t going to be a completely in-depth of every single aspect of levels and curves; it’s meant to be more of a practical overview to help get you on your way. If you’re looking for an in-depth technical explanation of how each little aspect actually works, you’re better off doing some research into professional photography books and magazines.

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Photoshop for Beginners; Put all your photos in one basket

In my last post, we talked lots about White Balance, and towards the end there I mentioned a nifty little program called CameraRaw and one of its best features – the ability to edit in batch. This means you can edit literally dozens of images at once; well, more specifically, you can edit one photograph and then apply all the adjustments to multiple others. This ensures consistency in your work, but also saves a great deal of time and effort!

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Photoshop for Beginners; Getting a Balanced Look

Since my last couple of posts have talked a lot about White Balance without going in to any great detail, I thought I’d make the second part of ‘Photoshop for Beginners’ about White Balance and, more specifically, how to correct it. I won’t be talking about how to manually control the WB in-camera, as there are plenty of other tutorials on how to do this; instead, I’ll be teaching you how to correct the WB when your camera gets it wrong, and one quick cheat to get perfect WB every single time.

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Free alternatives to Photoshop

Designing jewellery that looks good and feels great to wear is already a challenge; photographing your jewellery in a way that looks fetching and shows off your piece spectacularly is even more so!

We all know that photographing your jewellery to display online and in print is one of the best ways to self-publicise and sell your work, but editing these photographs and preparing them for print can sometimes be a daunting task for a beginner.

Luckily for you, help is at hand! I always intended for a major feature of this blog to be the tutorials I create, and decided to create a series explaining all the best ways to edit and refine your photographs before revealing them to the world at large.

One problem with this plan, however, is that photo editing requires software which can sometimes be rather expensive; I myself use and plan to teach Photoshop CS6, but what about those of you who can’t afford the several hundred pounds it takes to purchase such software?

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